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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the rights in the eu for compensation. so if you can't fly through a volcanic ash situation, they have to delay, you're going to have to pay somebody. those kind of rules are frankly stupid, and airlines are just going to have to raise their fares to cover the. >> jenna: the europe courts think this is a fair way to go. do you think it will come to the u.s. courts and carriers as well? >> reporter: oh, there are consumer twits out there all over the place that would love to see this happen. the fact of the matter is the unintended consequence of this would be outrageous. the three hour tarmac rule we have today, there weren't a lot of those, but it has increase airlines canceling flights when they think they might not get people off an airplane. if you really want more expensive tickets and want to have less air service, this is a great way to go. >> jenna: i might be a little bit, don't tell anybody, of a consumer twit when it comes to this because i do want some accountability when we fly. when you walk up to the desk and they say there's a delay, and you have no other options, you f
about, well, for the moment, the eu -- we have that kind of psychological factor. a healthy private sector. and the problem is what? the problem is government and bad policy. and that's what we have to offset. >> but jim iuorio, i want to know where to invest. do we buy gold, silver, and commodities? do we buy banks, which are lagging a little bit? do we buy industrial cyclicals to play the world boom, if there is such a thing? in other words, how do you invest right now, having passed this 14,000 benchmark? >> well, there's a couple things. first of all, when caterpillar released its earnings it talked about good numbers out of housing. and you stloe in china. you invest in things like copper. you know i still like gold and silver. and today with the green light from the fed i'm still going to stay in things like those. i am in bank of america. i am in health care. i think the stock market looks pretty good. you said before, though, the stock market tends to be a leading indicator of the economy. when the fed pumps in so much money and global banks pump in so much money, i think yo
of the bulge names in part because of the eu risk is higher in those. how serious do you take a day like today on that front? >> well, our biggest concern really is the continued unstable nature of greece. i think spain and italy will be fine as long as greece doesn't create a chain reaction, which i think it will. and i'm still very concerned about what is going on there. but as you guys pointed out, you know, you came into early 10, early 11, early 12 and felt good, trends were good and the eu kind of put the kibosh on ceo confidence and capital markets activity. i'm concerned about that. >> you seem less worried. >> we're more worried about the u.s. economy. i think what we're seeing now in the marketplace makes sense. we had the megabanks lead the rally late last year. we recently have switched to the regional banks outperforming the megabanks and now we're getting that normal consolidation period which is to be expected. look at the ten-year treasury yield, that's what we say. if above ten for first quarter -- above 2% for first quarter, then earnings estimates will probably go higher. wh
. >> now we go into a full eu heads of state summit. it will be interesting to see if that theory about the euro gains further traction. >> let's roll out the red carpet and watch for the arrivals. thanks, simon. let's get to rick santelli in chicago, where we're still talking about your punch bowl this morning, rick. >>> i'll tell you what, it never ceases to amaze me where somebody like mr. rubin could say nobody could have nope, and yet the government singles out s&p. there's more to this story, or maybe there isn't. like i said, you can't fight city hall. one guy always fighting the battle keeping us informed about what may or may not be happening in europe is mark brand, southwest securities. mark, you were just listening to mr. draghi, and many of your comments, along with many traders on this floor, everyone was wondering when a big salvo to lower the value of the euro will be emanating from europe to keep up with the japanese. has that day arrived? >> no, the day hasn't arrived ye. i'll tell you what has arrived. the way the eu works with the 17 people and the 17 countries in th
. in europe, the eu summit continues. but the action really taking its cues from china this morning. we have green arrows across the board in europe. take a look at asia. strong eco data out of china in focus. much more on that in just a moment. the road map begins at the golden arches. not even the cheddar onion burgers could help mcdonald's. they missed estimates in every region. asia was down a whopping 9.5%. >> exports boomed 25%, inflation cooled, but met expectations, capping off a two-week winning streak for stocks. >> a blowout quarter, users increase continued in momentum. >> the storm could be one for the record books. forecast calling for as much as 2 1/2 feet of snow in some parts of the northeast. already more than 3,700 flights have been canceled. we'll get more from the weather channel on the path of nemo. >>> mcdonald's down 1.9 in january. middle east and africa, europe saw a 1%, 2% decline. u.s. the only bright spot. comps up 9%. even some suggestion that asia, which is 40% japan, but also china, got tainted with the chicken contamination scare. >> that wouldn't surprise me
-year investigation that has been going on in the eu and to its search business there, the dominance of the google search engine. also helping the stock move higher today, brooke, wireless carriers activating a million android devices per day, giving apple a run for its money. >> good for those folks who got in when getting was good in '04. alison kosik, thank you. >>> broad picture, let's talk to jill schlessinger. jill, i knew i liked you. i was reading a piece today where you quoted the grateful dead in talking about the ups and downs of the dow jones. give me that line. >> it has been a long, strange trip. come on, now. just think about this, in the summer of 2007, we first crossed 14,000. and that was well before anyone really, the broad public understood we're about to become sucked into the precipice of disaster by the financial sector. so, of course, 14,000 doesn't feel quite as good this time around and frankly a lot of retail investors have not yet gotten back into the market after these last five or six bruising years, who could blame them. it has been agonizing. >> but, here's my debbi
. >> steve: there is a scandal that is rocking europe. folks in the e.u., european union, thought they were eating beef burgers and beef lasagna, only to learn it was horse meat. so should americans be worried that that can happen here? let's talk to fox news legal analyst and a lover of beef, peter johnson, jr. >> i am. short answer is no, i don't believe that there should be any fear in america with regard to horse meat entering our system as beef. but in europe, it's a significant issue and just this morning, it's been determine that a drug called bute, used to treat inflammation and even arthritis in horses was found in meat that was considered to be beef. two issues, drug contamination from horse meat, second issue, big cultural taboo. here in the united states and great britain, we do not, we are not, we don't want to eat horse, especially if it's called beef. so when we order a hamburger, we anticipate that the hamburger is beef. 100% beef. burger king over in great britain said listen, there is no problem here in the united states. and we've stopped our distributor over there where
. >> you're invited over here. >> we have scotland and then we will have the eu probably about 16 or 17 after the next -- >> i've invited you to be the 51st state over here. >> that's all you will be over here. >> you try to tax us without representation, we'll try to -- >> it's a good number. >> martin b what do you think about the referendum? >> i got myself into trouble by saying that it increases uncertainty. it's what i called the fifth grace one and so there's more uncertainty now. from a political point of view, there's -- >> because of the referendum? right. the prime minister made the right decision. the uk sort of right wing party, it liked the tea party, i guess, in some respects has gained 16% of the vote according to the polls. take more from the trres or from labor. so i think the prime minister was concerned about that. having a referendum laid it out. we did some polling, online polling after the speech. they thought the referendum was right. content of the speech was good, they would vote for the coming out of. there's a lot of work to be done until we get to the refere
job opportunities for -- and the eu commission is already discussing this i think this is something that has to be added, and that, i hope, will also increase the understanding of the population of these countries. >> what do you think about what the bank of japan is doing right now with its policies, really pressuring the yen, that adds pressure, in turn, to the euro, which has pushed higher, versus the yen on these things, the u.s. watches that very closely. what do you think of their policy? >> yes, of course, we do watch it. but i think it's much overblown to speak of the currency war, something like that. what we observe is that the japanese central bank, the japanese government, wants to avoid the deflationary development, which i think makes a lot of sense. so i'm not too much concerned about that. >> so it's not a beggar thy neighbor policy at this point with the central banks around the globe? >> no. if it really leads to higher growth, that is the intention to have, then it's not beggar thy neighbor, then it's something that is helpful for all of us. and with regard to the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)